The European Commission – the hamster’s friend

1 July, 2011

Now here’s a story to give you a warm glow, especially if you are a taxpayer in the European Union.

The European Union’s highest court officially reprimanded France on Thursday (9 June) for not doing enough to care for hamsters.

Ruling on a case brought by the European Commission three years ago, the  European Court of Justice determined that the French republic had shown a lack  of due care towards its dwindling population of the black-bellied rodents.

Wild European hamsters, which can live for four years and grow to more than  20 cm in length, are considered farmland pests, but are threatened with  extinction in their small habitat in Alsace, eastern France.

The court found France had allowed harmful crops and unchecked urbanisation  to destroy nearly 1,000 hamster burrows between 2001 and 2007.

“The court holds that the measures to protect the  European hamster in Alsace, implemented by France, were not adequate” to protect  the species, it said a statement,  adding that France needed to address the situation immediately.

Under the ruling, France must adjust its agriculture and urbanisation  practices or face daily fines from the European Union. As the European Court of  Justice is the EU’s highest court, France has no further right of appeal.

There are an estimated 800 wild European hamsters left in France, although  there are plentiful populations elsewhere on the continent.

Hamsters are protected under the EU Habitats Directive, which requires  countries to protect animal species “of Community interest,” including the  European hamster, the court recalled.

The mind boggles at the cost of this exercise, involving highly-paid Commission officials and armies of lawyers and officials.  No wonder that the European Union’s annual budget for administering its institutions, including the Commission and the European Court of Justice, is €8 billion (out of a total EU budget of about €140 billion) and rising.

I concede that there is some price that we should be willing to pay for biodiversity, and I acknowledge that the Commission has a mandate to take action against a Member State which has failed to comply with its obligations under European Union law.  But surely, when it comes to allocating resources to this role, there are greater priorities for the Commission than looking after a few hamsters?

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